McChord AFB, Period 9: 26 July, 2009

Banders: Daniel Froehlich, Chris Kessler (driver), Brett Wolfe, Tayler Brooks

Today we experienced some excitement, because I forgot to make key arrangements in advance to access the site through the usual locked McChord gate. I only realized this as we were driving down from Seattle. What to do? Well, on the off-chance that our trusty key-master in . . . → Read More: McChord AFB, Period 9: 26 July, 2009

McChord AFB, Period 8: 10 July, 2009

Banders: Daniel Froehlich (driver), Chris Kessler, Mike Walker, Tayler Brooks

As is typical for this period, we had a sharp decrease in bird numbers. Most of our captures were recaps, and most new birds were juveniles. Overall, Swainson’s Thrushes appear to making up for a dearth of captures in the beginning of the season, with the first . . . → Read More: McChord AFB, Period 8: 10 July, 2009

McChord AFB, Period 7: 3 July, 2009

Banders: Daniel Froehlich (driver), Brett Wolfe, Ben Johnson, Tayler Brooks

The birds kept us busy all day on July 3rd, with the highest number of captures yet, one more than the first day. It was our first sunny day, though it only started getting hot only after we closed the nets. The most unusual captures were . . . → Read More: McChord AFB, Period 7: 3 July, 2009

McChord AFB, Period 10: 30 July, 2009

Banders: Daniel Froehlich (driver), Chris Kessler, Ryan Merrill, Tayler Brooks

Well, the MAPS season at McChord kind of fizzled out today with nary a warbler in the nets. Warblers were scarce in general this year, with about one-quarter the number of Common Yellowthroats last year, for example. Instead, we cleaned up on sparrows with juvenile juncos, towhees . . . → Read More: McChord AFB, Period 10: 30 July, 2009

McChord AFB, Period 6: 25 June 2009

Banders: Daniel Froehlich, Dana Acevedo (driver), Ben Johnson

After a couple of cool days, this one was no different, on the verge of raining several times. We got lucky again. But our captures probably suffered with a pretty low turnout of just 34 captures for the day. We made up a bit for low numbers of . . . → Read More: McChord AFB, Period 6: 25 June 2009

McChord AFB, Period 5: June 11, 2009

Banders: Mike Walker, Daniel Froehlich, Chris Kessler (driver), Ben Johnson

On June 11, rain threatened to disrupt our banding, but we were lucky: it started spitting just after we’d closed nets for the day. The species composition today was almost identical to last period’s: switch out Chipping Sparrow for Junco and MacGillivray’s Warbler for Western Tanager and . . . → Read More: McChord AFB, Period 5: June 11, 2009

McChord AFB, Period 4: June 6, 2009

Banders: Mike Walker, Andrea Wuenschel, Suzanne Tomassi, Daniel Froehlich, driver

On June 6, 2009, we banded at McChord AFB under cloudy skies and cool temperatures, just like last year in 2008. Just minutes after we closed we caught a light sprinkle. We caught 44 individuals of 17 species, fewer birds but more diversity than last year. A . . . → Read More: McChord AFB, Period 4: June 6, 2009

McChord Summary from 30 July 2008

Our final MAPS banding day was cool again following a nighttime rain shower. Our nets finally saw an influx of juveniles reflecting the very late spring we had. The station seemed quiet, but only because singing had died down: birds were congregating in the wet areas of the station and ended up giving us . . . → Read More: McChord Summary from 30 July 2008

McChord Summary for 22 July 2008

Today was cloudy, cool and windy; bird activity at our nets was unusually low with only 25 captures of 23 individuals. Only four individuals were recaptured from previous days. Juveniles finally predominated, mostly Song Sparrows and Swainson’s Thrushes. Adults were few, probably mostly avoiding much movement since the most interesting season, molt, proved to . . . → Read More: McChord Summary for 22 July 2008

McChord Summary for 12 July 2008

Certainly the most remarkable bird today was a wizened MacGillivray’s Warbler recapture of a bird originally banded as an adult in May 2001. This sets a new longevity record for this species: 7 years and 2 months from first capture to recapture (which is the same as the current longevity record), but an individual . . . → Read More: McChord Summary for 12 July 2008