The regulars at McDaniel Lake

Photo by Dan Froehlich.

Western Tanagers are very common at McDaniel Lake, cruising the timber, perching on exposed branches and even flycatching over the marsh.  I observed one adult male get displaced from a stick in the marsh by a Spotted Sandpiper!  This adult male is typical of the many adult males . . . → Read More: The regulars at McDaniel Lake

Interesting plumage

Spotted towhee. Photo by Dan Froehlich.

Despite the unusual rains, we’ve caught some interesting birds.  This Spotted Towhee surprised us at Cash Prairie.  Last year, we didn’t have SPTO at any of our sites, though we detected them regularly down lower just above the Nile Valley.  This juvenile was interesting not just for . . . → Read More: Interesting plumage

McChord AFB, Period 10: 30 July, 2009

Banders: Daniel Froehlich (driver), Chris Kessler, Ryan Merrill, Tayler Brooks

Well, the MAPS season at McChord kind of fizzled out today with nary a warbler in the nets. Warblers were scarce in general this year, with about one-quarter the number of Common Yellowthroats last year, for example. Instead, we cleaned up on sparrows with juvenile juncos, towhees . . . → Read More: McChord AFB, Period 10: 30 July, 2009

McChord Summary from 30 July 2008

Our final MAPS banding day was cool again following a nighttime rain shower. Our nets finally saw an influx of juveniles reflecting the very late spring we had. The station seemed quiet, but only because singing had died down: birds were congregating in the wet areas of the station and ended up giving us . . . → Read More: McChord Summary from 30 July 2008

McChord Summary for 22 July 2008

Today was cloudy, cool and windy; bird activity at our nets was unusually low with only 25 captures of 23 individuals. Only four individuals were recaptured from previous days. Juveniles finally predominated, mostly Song Sparrows and Swainson’s Thrushes. Adults were few, probably mostly avoiding much movement since the most interesting season, molt, proved to . . . → Read More: McChord Summary for 22 July 2008

McChord Summary for 12 July 2008

Certainly the most remarkable bird today was a wizened MacGillivray’s Warbler recapture of a bird originally banded as an adult in May 2001. This sets a new longevity record for this species: 7 years and 2 months from first capture to recapture (which is the same as the current longevity record), but an individual . . . → Read More: McChord Summary for 12 July 2008

McChord Summary for 7 July 2008

Activity at the station changed markedly today: the fledglings are out and adults are going crazy keeping track of them and feeding them to shut them up. Evolutionary biologists consider juvenile vocal begging as a kind of extortion: “I won’t shut up unless you feed me,” threatening the adults’ reproductive success by attracting predators. . . . → Read More: McChord Summary for 7 July 2008

McChord Summary for 26 June 2008

My favorite part of the station is where the willow thickets along the short stream flowing from the pond to the pothole wetlands tuck under the old, towering Douglas firs hugging the pond shore. Fledglings congregate, the pond shimmers, Douglas squirrels chatter, the stream burbles, and every now and then gentle sylphs whisper in . . . → Read More: McChord Summary for 26 June 2008